26 August 2011

SOLDIERS PHOTOGRAPH EVERY GRAVE IN ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY and SEARCHABLE DATABASE MAY RESULT

More than 300,000 people buried there... 219,000 grave markers... and a few messed up burials or confused records... so the Army decided to take a photographic inventory. This project may turn into a searchable database!

As someone who has a relative in Arlington, which came up on FindAGrave, I am feeling excited about the possibility of a comprehensive database.

Attaching to a Yahoo news article by Kimberly Hefling of Associated Press!

24 August 2011

FROM LIFE BETWEEN LIFE by JOEL L. WHITTON and JOE FISHER

Life Between Life
Scientific Explorations Into the Void Separating One Incarnation From the Next!
C authors Joel L. Whitton and Joe Fisher
A Dolphin Book (Doubeday)

page 65-66


"Ghandi, the great Indian philosopher and apostle of non-violence, attributed certain benevolence to the cosmic process (of forgetting past lives) when he replied "It is natures' kindness that we do not remember past births. Life would be a burden if we carried such a tremendous load of memories." Yet is is possible to break through this amnesia either with the aid of hypnosis or by activating "far memory" through practiced and purposeful meditative techniques. One of the most popular arguments against reincarnation maintains that all past-life memory is really genetic in origin, that the hereditary line accounts not only for physical resemblance and a persons strengths, weakness,and predispositions but also for a recall beyond birth which is, supposedly, coded into the DNA molecules. The evidence of hypnotic regression promptly dismisses this contention. In trance, whites have described experiences as negro slaves and many subjects have talked about being incarnated during their parent's lifetimes."

18 August 2011

CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORP RECORDS : NOT IMPOSSIBLE : NATIONAL ARCHIVES IS FIRST STEP FOR GENERAL INFORMATION

I was challenged to find Civilian Conservation Corps records.

The Corps was a New Deal project to put poor youth to work. Young men could sign up for 6 months to 2 years, were paid $30 a month (while sheltered, fed, and clothed) of which $25 went to their families. The National Archives does have records, but not a searchable database that would bring up the names of those enrolled. Here is the link to information that will help you order a search for a fee, but it looks like you have to know all the details to get the information which I always find to be a bugaboo: http://www.ccclegacy.org/research.htm CCC LEGACY. ORG

I found this searchable site for PENNSYLVANIA linked above. There may be others for other states. (Unfortunately the person I was looking for was not in this database.) I would like to think that the information is organized by the state the person originated from or where they signed up, but it turns out that a person could serve in more than one camp and in various states before their service was up.

This is a truly excellent site, linked to Pennsylvania state parks, which benefited greatly from the physical labor of the CCC. You can search by name or camp. The site leans heavily on the James F. Justin CCC Museum on line, which is perhaps the best overall site for CCC research.

14 August 2011

WOMEN OF CHERNOBEL : A WORLD OF BABUSHKAS : MORE MAGAZINE

More magazine did a photo essay with interviews of the Russian women, most over 70, who returned to Chernobyl’s desolate, radioactive surroundings. Said one "when you live outside your village, you loose your soul." This is the world of the bubuskas - 80% women - tending their animals and gardens.

This article made me think about having an attraction to ancestral places.

Is it in my soul to live near mountains or with mountains in the distance as my ancestors did?

Nadezhda Tislenko, 71 "When this widow met up with more’s team—reporter, photographer, translator— she immediately called a neighbor, saying, “hurry, quick, come over. There’s interesting people here, and they’re not missionaries!”

08 August 2011

THE DEAT BEAT by MARILYN JOHNSON - THE WORLD OF OBITUARY WRITERS EXPOSED! BOOK EXCERPTS

THE DEAT BEAT
Lost Souls, Lucky Stiffs, and the Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries



You're going to love this one because it is sad, funny, and true.
Marilyn Johnson explores the world of Obituary Writers, and here is an excerpt
from page 117.

"What does it take to be a good obituary writer? Reporting skills, life experience, and something I can't quite pin down - an ability to weigh someones life and accomplishments historically, in the context of the times. A good obit writer has to communicate the significance of a person, a place, an era. Sense of humor? It's a good survival skill, and it adds a lot to the pleasure we take in some writers' work, but I don't think it's essential. Neither is empathy. As for "style," that's also optional. What it takes to be a good obituary writer is an ability to write well, to capture a person with economy and grace, and work in the hurricane of emotion that swirls around the newly dead."

Examples of great obits that capture the imagination of the reader and bring the recently deceased to life one more time abound in this book. Examples come from Great Britain and the United States. More you get to meet some of the best obit writers - journalists dedicated to the research - interviewing - as well as turn of phrase. Jim Nicholson, who did plenty of newspaper work as an investigative reporter before he started writing obits says, "There aren't any boring people; there are just boring questions." He was once a broken-down journalist who learned how to get his scoops by scoping out the beat - mortuaries - neighbors.

Here's a funny one for you from page 49

"Selma Koch, a Manhattan store owner who earned a national reputation by helping women find the right bra size, mostly through a discerning glance and never with a tape measure, died Thursday at Mount Sinai Medical Center. She was 95 and a 34B."

And from page 159 from a writer named McKie, who ran an obit prematurely....

"I apologize unreservedly to our readers for having mislead them. More importantly, I apologize to Mrs. Ritter. I am genuinely delighted she is still with us - I came to like her a lot while preparing her obituary for the page.

She may even have the good luck to follow Cockie Hoogterp, whose premature obituary The Daily Telegraph published in 1938. After 50 years, during which she sent back all her bills with the word "Deceased" scrawled across them, it was referred to again in the newspaper. She then wrote in to say, "Mrs. Hoogsterp wishes it to be known that she has not yet been screwed into her coffin."

02 August 2011

THE BOOK OF LIVES : THE BIBLE : AMERICAN SPIRIT MAGAZINE

Linking here to the magazine that The Daughters of the American Revolution put out, called AMERICAN SPIRIT. It's put out every other month, and the July/August Magazine has an article by Bill Hudgins called The Book of Lives.

"Plain or Fancy the Family Bible Has Long Preserved Genealogical Treasures"

The magazine doesn't have this article on line, but this is a good magazine to subscribe to if you're interested in DAR or Americana or genealogy research. And here is a wonderful excerpt from the article.


"The first Bible printed in the Colonies was a translation in a dialect of Algonquian produced 1660-1661 by John Eliot, a Presbyterian minister in Massachusetts according to A Light to the Nations: American's Earliest Bibles 1532-1864, By Diana Lupas.
The next domestic Bible was printed in German in 1743 by Christoph Saur in Germantown, Pennsylvania. His Son, also named Christoph, took over the printing business and republished the German Bible in 1763 and 1776. In 1778, the Continental Army confiscated Saur's property, including printed sheets for about 1000 Bibles. Another printer bought them at auction, then sold them to be used in making cartridges for bullets, according to A Light to Nations.

01 August 2011



Our genetic and spiritual ancestors help us with our research quests and, while we follow a linear research path, amazing dreams and synronicities abound.

We explore multicultural ancestry worship and the use of genealogy for past-life verification, as well as practical ways and means to achieve your research goals.